Vogue

Vogue

  • 346
    Spotify
  • 22.2m
    Instagram

Vogue is a musician. Vogue keeps a low profile on Spotify with only a popularity score of 16 out of 100 and around 300 followers as of 2018. Vogue's most popular track on Spotify is "Club Fever" from the album Bring. Vogue's Instagram account (@voguemagazine) has a sizable fanbase with about 22 million followers. Vogue's recent posts to Instagram have gotten around 61,000 likes each.

Vogue Popular Songs

Popularity
16/100
Followers
346
TrackPopularity
Bring1
Club Fever
Bring
Bring2
Bring the House Down - Vogue Remix
Bring
Give Me Ur Lovin'3
Give Me Ur Lovin'
Give Me Ur Lovin' - Single
Lo kik Selected vol.84
Saint Tropez - Original Mix
Lo kik Selected vol.8
Best of 2011 Vol II5
The Gypsy Kings - Original mix
Best of 2011 Vol II
See All Vogue Music

As of 2018, Vogue has 300 followers and a popularity score of 16 on Spotify. Bring and Give Me Ur Lovin' - Single are some of the more popular Vogue albums. Notable tracks from these albums include Club Fever, Bring the House Down - Vogue Remix, and Give Me Ur Lovin'. Club Fever is Vogue's most popular track, scoring 24 out of 100 on the popularity scale. Bring the House Down - Vogue Remix and Give Me Ur Lovin' have popularity scores of 21 and 18, respectively. The Spotify popularity score is on a scale from 0 to 100 and reflects the number of times the song has been played and how recently it has been played.

Vogue Instagram

  • Instagram profile picture for Vogue
  • 5688
    posts
  • 22.2m
    followers
  • 398
    following
Vogue
The official Instagram of American Vogue.
http://vogue.cm/fMhDzxr
The Fall 2019 season has been over for a week, and the moments that linger tell many stories: about the passing of one of the all-time greats; about the power of craft in a technological age; about an industry reckoning with its own impact on climate change; and of the hopeful promise of a design talent striking out on his own. More of this in 2020, please! Tap the link in our bio to relive some of our Fall 2019 highlights. Photographed by @hunterabramsVogue Instagram: The Fall 2019 season has been over for a week, and the moments that linger tell many stories: about the passing of one of the all-time greats; about the power of craft in a technological age; about an industry reckoning with its own impact on climate change; and of the hopeful promise of a design talent striking out on his own. More of this in 2020, please! Tap the link in our bio to relive some of our Fall 2019 highlights. Photographed by @hunterabrams
For survivors of Japanese-American incarceration and their descendants, history is repeating itself with horrific accuracy. There is an echo of Roosevelt’s executive order in Trump’s national emergency declaration, both of which seem almost banal on paper; all 9066 did was to exclude certain people from certain places, then empower certain others to “relocate” them, just as Trump’s national emergency “diverts funds.” Clinical language belies an American predilection for state violence. 
So the act of counter-documentation becomes resistance. “Telling our stories will keep us alive,” writes Tani Ikeda, a documentarian who filmed at the deadly Unite the Right rally at Charlottesville, Virginia; at the Women’s March on Washington; and at Los Angeles International Airport when Trump’s travel ban went into effect. “They will open the heart of this country by breaking it.” Above: Lila Fumiye Sasaki, 88, kneels at the memorial grave site of Okei Ito. The tombstone reads, “In Memory of Okei, Died 1871. Aged 19 years. A Japanese Girl,” in English and in Japanese. 
Sasaki grew up in rural Auburn on a fruit orchard. “From 1942 to 1945, I was shut away in ‘internment’ ‘relocation’ camps. From home to Tule Lake, California, to Jerome, Arkansas, to Amache, Colorado. These were turbulent times, unconstitutional, humiliating for all,” she told Vogue in a handwritten letter. Sasaki went on to become a registered nurse with a degree in nursing from Stanford. Her letter ends, “Today, I am a mother with four grown children, a physician, graphic designer, structural engineer, and a salesman. Also the proud grandmother of five grandchildren. And they are all GRAND!”
Tap the link in our bio to read more about these #AmericanWomen. Photographed by @katsunaito, written by @bridgetgillardVogue Instagram: For survivors of Japanese-American incarceration and their descendants, history is repeating itself with horrific accuracy. There is an echo of Roosevelt’s executive order in Trump’s national emergency declaration, both of which seem almost banal on paper; all 9066 did was to exclude certain people from certain places, then empower certain others to “relocate” them, just as Trump’s national emergency “diverts funds.” Clinical language belies an American predilection for state violence. So the act of counter-documentation becomes resistance. “Telling our stories will keep us alive,” writes Tani Ikeda, a documentarian who filmed at the deadly Unite the Right rally at Charlottesville, Virginia; at the Women’s March on Washington; and at Los Angeles International Airport when Trump’s travel ban went into effect. “They will open the heart of this country by breaking it.” Above: Lila Fumiye Sasaki, 88, kneels at the memorial grave site of Okei Ito. The tombstone reads, “In Memory of Okei, Died 1871. Aged 19 years. A Japanese Girl,” in English and in Japanese. Sasaki grew up in rural Auburn on a fruit orchard. “From 1942 to 1945, I was shut away in ‘internment’ ‘relocation’ camps. From home to Tule Lake, California, to Jerome, Arkansas, to Amache, Colorado. These were turbulent times, unconstitutional, humiliating for all,” she told Vogue in a handwritten letter. Sasaki went on to become a registered nurse with a degree in nursing from Stanford. Her letter ends, “Today, I am a mother with four grown children, a physician, graphic designer, structural engineer, and a salesman. Also the proud grandmother of five grandchildren. And they are all GRAND!” Tap the link in our bio to read more about these #AmericanWomen. Photographed by @katsunaito, written by @bridgetgillard
Audrina Patridge (@audrinapatridge), Whitney Port (@whitneyeveport), Justin Bobby (@justinbobbybrescia), and Spencer's sister Stephanie Pratt (@officialstephpratt), pictured above, will all appear in @MTV's reboot of #TheHills. The new plotlines will still center around the female stars—only this time they have more established careers, better real estate, and occasionally babies to contend with, alongside the same old drama. Mostly, the cast says, New Beginnings is about getting a real look inside their lives. “I can remember one of the earliest episodes [of The Hills], I was driving in my X5 with my friend Alicia, drinking Red Bulls and driving to the club to yell at Brody for taking Lauren’s side over my brother’s in a fight about Heidi and their relationship. I was listening to Mobb Deep, “Quiet Storm”, I think it was, and I was just so pumped on adrenaline, not really thinking about the consequences. I still never think about the consequences whenever I do anything, which is really bad," says @officialstephpratt. "But anyway, I thought it was super unfair that Brody was siding with this girl instead of Spencer who he’s known since he was 15 and I was like, I am going to take them down. I got there, the crew was mic-ing me in the parking lot and I was in this dumb blue dress and I was just so nervous. They were trying to explain to me where the table was inside the club and I was like, wait, I’m really bad with directions, I’m dyslexic, so I’m not going to find it. Well I did, it looked like a real movie set with all of the lights and equipment and I went over and screamed at them. Later, I ended up having secret friend dates with Lauren in Hollywood. Becoming friends with her destroyed my relationship with Spencer. We didn’t speak for a long time. If this new show hadn’t happened, it would have been 10, 11, 20 more years of not seeing or speaking to my brother. The reboot is a miracle.” Tap the link in our bio to read the full story. Photographed by @gigilaub, written by @brookebobbVogue Instagram: Audrina Patridge (@audrinapatridge), Whitney Port (@whitneyeveport), Justin Bobby (@justinbobbybrescia), and Spencer's sister Stephanie Pratt (@officialstephpratt), pictured above, will all appear in @MTV's reboot of #TheHills. The new plotlines will still center around the female stars—only this time they have more established careers, better real estate, and occasionally babies to contend with, alongside the same old drama. Mostly, the cast says, New Beginnings is about getting a real look inside their lives. “I can remember one of the earliest episodes [of The Hills], I was driving in my X5 with my friend Alicia, drinking Red Bulls and driving to the club to yell at Brody for taking Lauren’s side over my brother’s in a fight about Heidi and their relationship. I was listening to Mobb Deep, “Quiet Storm”, I think it was, and I was just so pumped on adrenaline, not really thinking about the consequences. I still never think about the consequences whenever I do anything, which is really bad," says @officialstephpratt. "But anyway, I thought it was super unfair that Brody was siding with this girl instead of Spencer who he’s known since he was 15 and I was like, I am going to take them down. I got there, the crew was mic-ing me in the parking lot and I was in this dumb blue dress and I was just so nervous. They were trying to explain to me where the table was inside the club and I was like, wait, I’m really bad with directions, I’m dyslexic, so I’m not going to find it. Well I did, it looked like a real movie set with all of the lights and equipment and I went over and screamed at them. Later, I ended up having secret friend dates with Lauren in Hollywood. Becoming friends with her destroyed my relationship with Spencer. We didn’t speak for a long time. If this new show hadn’t happened, it would have been 10, 11, 20 more years of not seeing or speaking to my brother. The reboot is a miracle.” Tap the link in our bio to read the full story. Photographed by @gigilaub, written by @brookebobb
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